• Aesthetics & Anti-Aging

    Take Years Off Your Skin With Our Non-Surgical Stem Cell Facelift

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  • Medical Weight Loss

    Successfully lose weight with our elite programs including the hCG diet.

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  • Hormone Replacement

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  • Sports Medicine

    Natural Performance Enhancement and Injury Repair

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  • Oncology & Chronic Disease

    Effective natural therapies for cancer, Lyme, and other chronic disease.

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  • Aesthetics & Anti-Aging

    Anti-Aging Take Years Off Your Skin With Our Non-Surgical Stem Cell Facelift

  • Medical Weight loss

    Loss Successfully lose weight with our elite programs including the hCG diet.

  • Hormone Replacement

    Replacement Live longer. Live healthier.

  • Sports Medicine

    Natural Performance Enhancement and Injury Repair

  • Oncology & Chronic Disease

    Chronic Disease Effective natural therapies for cancer, Lyme, and other chronic disease.

Monthly Archives: October 2014

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Fennel is packed with phytonutrients that provide strong antioxidant activity. Anethole, a phytonutrient compound found in fennel, has been proven in animal studies to reduce inflammation and even help prevent cancer. In addition, fennel bulb is an excellent source of vitamin C, which contributes to a healthy immune system and can help protect against pain and joint deterioration from conditions like osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Fennel bulb is also a good source of fiber and potassium, and may help reduce bad cholesterol and protect from stroke and heart attack.

Sunflower Sprouts

Native American cultures have known about the many uses and benefits of sunflower for centuries.  Sunflower can be used as food, an oil source, and even as a dye pigment. As a food and health source, sunflower tops the list of sprouts as a protein source. They contain minerals, healthy fats, essential fatty acids, fiber Continue Reading

Indoor farming at home: boosting health with sprouts

Sprouts are different from their full-grown counterparts. Studies have shown that sprouts support cell regeneration, offer powerful antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and enzymes, and have an alkalizing effect on your body, which may help protect against disease, including cancer. During sprouting, vitamin C levels are higher than any other point in the plant’s life cycle. This is also the time when plants begin to synthesize new enzymes and some sprouts can contain up to 100 times more enzymes than raw fruits and vegetables. Still, some sprouts are negatively different from their full-grown counterparts, such as Sorghum, which is perfectly safe when full-grown, but the seed coat carries potentially toxic levels of cyanide, making eating these sprouts a gamble. Because sprouts vary so much from one variety to the next, as well as from their full-grown counterparts, it is a good idea to consult your naturopathic doctor when considering adding sprouts to your diet. While you can usually purchase sprouts through your local grocer or farmer’s market, sprouting at home has definite advantages. Sprouts are delicate and need to be handled carefully and refrigerated. Most importantly, they need to be as fresh as possible to provide the most significant health benefits. Sprouting at home not only allows you to get sprouts at their peak freshness every time, but it also allows you to experiment with a wide variety. Here are 5 tips to get you started having fun with and reaping the benefits of the healthiest possible sprouts, at home.